Lindberg Baby Kidnapping

INTRODUCTION
 
The case that gripped the nation in 1932, the Theft of the Eaglet, the kidnapping and murder of the son of Charles A. Lindberg, the first man to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. 
 
 

BOOKS: 

The Case That Never Dies: The Lindbergh Kidnapping

Author(s): 

Gardner, Lloyd C.

Publisher: 

Rutgers University Press

Year: 

2004

ISBN (10 digit): 

978-0813533858

Description: 

When Charles Lindbergh's baby son was mysteriously taken from his home near Hopewell, New Jersey, in 1932, the world was shocked. It happened during the worst period of the Great Depression, at a time when kidnapping neared epidemic proportions across the nation. Despite the overwhelming publicity the case received both at the time and in all the years since, many controversies surrounding the "Crime of the Century" and subsequent trial have never been resolved. The Case That Never Dies is a comprehensive study of the Lindbergh kidnapping, investigation, and trial, placing it in the context of the Depression, when many feared the country was on the edge of anarchy. Historian Lloyd C. Gardner delves deeply into aspects of the case that remain confusing to this day. These include Lindbergh's dealings with crime baron Owney Madden, Al Capone's New York counterpart, through gangland intermediaries, as well as the inexplicable exploits of John Condon, a retired schoolteacher who became the prosecution's chief witness. The initial investigation was hampered by Colonel Lindbergh, who insisted that the police not attempt to find the perpetrator because he feared the investigation would endanger his son's life. He relented only when the child was found dead. After two years of fruitless searching, a German immigrant, Bruno Richard Hauptmann, was discovered to have some of the ransom money in his possession. Hauptmann was arrested, tried, and sentenced to death. Throughout the book, Gardner pays special attention to the evidence of the case and how it was used and misused in the trial. Whether Hauptman was guilty or not, Gardner concludes that there was insufficient evidence to convict him of first-degree murder. The Case That Never Dies draws upon never-before-used FBI records that reveal the animosity between J. Edgar Hoover and Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of the New Jersey State Police. The story is filled with incredible twists and turns that continue to fascinate people. Set in historical context, this book offers not only a compelling read, but a powerful vantage point from which to observe the United States in the 1930s, as well as contemporary arguments over capital punishment.

The Lindbergh Baby Kidnapping Trial: A Primary Source Account

Author(s): 

Roensch, Greg

Publisher: 

Rosen Publishing Group; 1 edition

Year: 

2003

ISBN (10 digit): 

978-0823939718

Description: 

These titles examine the details of both trials utilizing photographs, copies of original transcripts, political cartoons, and quotations from those involved. Scopes, although complicated, is written with respectful attention to the issues of evolution and creationism, the separation of church and state, and the power of the government. Readers interested in the law will be captivated by the complexities of the arguments, presented by Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan. Olson's writing style evokes the "broiling courtroom" of July 1925 in Tennessee and readers can almost hear the reporters recounting events of the trial on the newly invented radio. The events of the Lindbergh case are portrayed with sensitivity to the pain of the family as well as that of Bruno Hauptmann, who maintained his innocence until he was executed. Evidence used in the trial is portrayed using primary-source images of the kidnapper's ransom notes, the sleeping suit worn by the baby when kidnapped, and Bruno Hauptmann's handwriting samples. Both texts are excellent purchases for research of these important events in 20th-century American history.-Rebecca Sheridan, Easttown Library & Information Center, Berwyn, PA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

The Lindbergh Case

Author(s): 

Fisher, Jim

Publisher: 

Rutgers University Press

Year: 

1994

ISBN (10 digit): 

978-0813521473

Description: 

Fisher, a former FBI agent, teaches criminal justice at Edinboro University in Pennsylvania. Refuting those who claim that Bruno Richard Hauptmann was framed, the author presents a convincing case that he was guilty of the kidnap-murder of 20-month-old Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. In this well-documented study Fisher thoroughly covers the case, from the night the baby was taken from his home in Hopewell, N.J., on March 1, 1932, to Hauptmann's execution on April 3, 1936. The author vivifies the people involved: the child's parents; eccentric Dr. Condon who paid the ransom to "Cemetery John"; the competing investigators; the charlatans who offered to ransom the baby for huge sums; etc. Although Fisher notes that the police made mistakes and that Hauptmann's defense was incompetent, he argues that evidence of the accused's guilt is overwhelming.

Crime of the Century: The Lindbergh Kidnapping Hoax

Author(s): 

Ahlgren, Gregory and Monier, Stephen

Publisher: 

Branden Books

Year: 

1993

ISBN (10 digit): 

978-0828319713

Description: 

After it was announced that the twenty month old son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh was abducted on March 1, 1932, the entire world grieved for their loss. Seventy-two days later, the body was found in the woods next to a roadway, a short distance from Lindbergh's house, near Hopewell, New Jersey. In 1927, Lindbergh was the first to fly solo across the Atlantic in his Spirit of St. Louis. By 1932, he was perhaps the most famous man alive. A great American hero, he was allowed to be the chief architect of the investigation into his son's kidnapping. He demanded that the body be cremated without an autopsy. This book traces the 2½ year investigation by the New Jersey State Police, headed by Colonel H. Norman Schwarz¬kopf, and which led to the arrest, trial, conviction and execu¬tion of Bruno Richard Hauptmann. It challenges the effective¬ness of the investigation, and the evidence advanced by the prosecution, which convicted Hauptmann. More importantly, it dissects evidence previously over¬looked of Lindbergh's own role in his son's disappearance, which, in combination with the authors' expert analysis, leads to a new and bold assertion as to who actually committed the Crime of the Century.

Lindbergh: The Crime

Author(s): 

Behn, Noel

Publisher: 

Onyx

Year: 

1995

ISBN (10 digit): 

978-0451405890

Description: 

Substituting innuendo for logic, Behn ( Big Stick-up at Brink's! ) proposes to identify the "true" culprits behind the 1932 kidnapping and murder of the infant Charles Lindbergh Jr., crimes for which Bruno Hauptmann was executed in 1936. While most researchers today doubt that Hauptmann acted alone, Behn maintains Hauptmann's total innocence. The author rehashes a theory that first circulated in the 1930s: that the baby was battered to death by his aunt, Elisabeth Morrow, allegedly an imbalanced young woman driven to insanity when famous aviator Charles Lindbergh married her sister Anne instead of her. The aviator, argues Behn, fabricated the kidnapping to protect the Lindbergh and Morrow families from scandal. The chief sources here are a book hastily assembled in 1932 by reporter Laura Vitray after she was fired from her newspaper, and the author's conversations with a nonagenarian lawyer who claims that a Morrow servant implicated Elisabeth. Behn does not, however, point out that the servant in question was himself a suspect. Aspersions on Lindbergh's character constitute the rest of the "evidence." Those with a serious interest in the subject are advised to read Joyce Milton's recent, assiduously researched Loss of Eden.